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About Baltimore Lawyers Wright, Constable & Skeen

The history of Wright, Constable & Skeen would not be complete without the many veterans who played a part in our past. With deep gratitude—and as part of our tradition—we honor them and all the brave veterans from Maryland who have served in every theater of the war.

Here we feature two veterans who figure prominently in the Wright, Constable & Skeen story.

Of Counsel to the Firm at the time of his death in 2007, “Francis (“Ike”) Iglehart fought in the Battle of the Bulge, where 10 soldiers in his squad of 12 were killed. In a memoir of his military experience, Ike recounted, “Two eighteen year old replacements in a hole ten yards to the left were killed instantly by direct hit, and we struggled to the company command post after nightfall with a party of four dragging the bodies in blankets.” Ike was awarded the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, and Combat Infantry Badge, as well as three campaign stars.

Click here to read Mr. Iglehart’s World War II memoir, The Short Life of the ASTP, published by American Literary Press (1997). Permission graciously provided by Mr. Iglehart’s family.

Major Jack Skeen was a young attorney with little experience in December 1945 when General Douglas MacArthur appointed him chief defense counsel in the war crimes trial of Japanese General Homma Masaharu, “The Beast of Bataan.” Although Homma was convicted, his sentence of facing a firing squad—a more honorable death for a soldier— as opposed to hanging was considered a victory. John Henry “Jack” Pictured: Major Skeen and General Homma at war crimes trial.

Click here to read the article and view photographs, from Peter B. Cook’s “Beast of Bataan,” American History magazine (March/April 1996).

Ike

Major Skeen and General HommaMajor Jack Skeen was a young attorney with little experience in December 1945 when General Douglas MacArthur appointed him chief defense counsel in the war crimes trial of Japanese General Homma Masaharu, “The Beast of Bataan.” Although Homma was convicted, his sentence of facing a firing squad—a more honorable death for a soldier— as opposed to hanging was considered a victory. John Henry “Jack” Pictured: Major Skeen and General Homma at war crimes trial.